DISCLAIMER

Please do not attempt to perform any of these lifts without proper coaching or supervision from a certified USAW coach.  The following is to be used for informational purposes only, it is not a guide for how to perform Olympic Weightlifting, simply an explanation for anyone who is interested in better understanding the lifts.

THE LIFTS

Olympic Weightlifting consists of two movements where an athlete takes a barbell from the ground to overhead, the Snatch and the Clean & Jerk.  In the Snatch, the barbell is taken from the ground directly to a locked out overhead standing position in one explosive and dynamic movement, while the Clean & Jerk is divided into two separate movements, taking the barbell from the floor to the shoulders with the clean and from the shoulders to overhead in the jerk.

These two lifts are performed for competition in sequence starting with 3 attempts for the Snatch followed by 3 attempts for the Clean & Jerk.  The highest total weight lifted in the Snatch is then added to the highest total in the Clean & Jerk to give you a total weight lifted which is your score for the competition.

SNATCH

After establishing the starting position, the athlete uses a deadlift to take the barbell from the ground to just past the knees in what is called the “first pull”.  The “second pull" begins where the first ends and consists of the athlete bringing their torso into a vertical position while driving off of the floor with his/her legs to generate barbell upward momentum and ends when the athlete is fully extended at the knees and hips, slightly leaning back to keep the barbell over the middle of the foot.  The "third pull" and most difficult to master, continues where the second leaves off as the athlete uses the barbells inertia as a anchor to literally pull him/herself under the bar into a full squat while catching the barbell in the “receiving position”.  Once the athlete has control of the barbell he/she pushes upward while driving into the floor with the legs to stand up into a full erect position. 

 

The lift is complete when the athletes knees, hips, and elbows are fully locked out and he/she has control of the barbell overhead.

CLEAN & JERK

Just as in the Snatch, after establishing the starting position the athlete uses a deadlift to take the barbell from the ground to just past the knees in the first pull.  The athlete then initiates the second pull, bringing the torso into a vertical position and driving off of the floor until the knees and hips are fully extended with the torso slightly leaning back, creating maximum upward barbell momentum.  The athlete then pulls him/herself under the bar into a full squat and catches the barbell in the receiving position.  This is however, where the Clean & Jerk differs from the Snatch in that the receiving position is on the shoulders instead of in a locked out position overhead.  The athlete then drives into the floor with his/her legs to stand up into a fully erect position where the clean ends and the jerk begins.  To initiate the jerk, the athlete bends his/her knees then drives off of the floor, propelling the barbell upwards, followed by pushing the bar up with their shoulders and arms while dropping into a receiving position with the lower body going into a partial to full lunge.  The athlete then brings their feet, one by one, directly back underneath them while balancing the barbell overhead. 

 

The lift is complete when the athletes knees, hips, and elbows are fully locked out and he/she has control of the barbell overhead.

DYNAMIC WARM-UP

Dynamic stretching has been proven to help increase power, improve flexibility, increase your range of motion, and reduce your risk of injury.  Your body has many mechanisms that need to be activated and stimulated before performing activity.  When you put your body through a series of stretches while in motion, it sends signals from the brain to the muscle fibers and connective tissues in that area to prepare to do work.  Your body’s temperature begins to rise and blood is pumped to the working areas of the body.  Getting good blood flow to the area of the working muscles is very critical in order to supply the area with the energy needed to do work.  Along with getting proper blood flow to the working area, the muscle fibers and connective tissues will gain more flexibility and range of motion.  The following is our weightlifting specific warm-up routine.  This routine will take you approximately 10 minutes.

SUPPLEMENTAL EXERCISES

There are many exercises used to increase the performance of the weightlifter.  The two individual Olympic lifts are broken up into many segmented pieces used as exercises training different portions of the actual full lifts themselves.  There are many variations and combinations of a technical nature which will not be explained and saved for live demonstration.   The following is a list of some of the main supplementary exercises used within a training period.  This is just to be used as an example, they are not in any particular order and this is not a complete list:

BACK SQUAT

FRONT SQUAT

OVERHEAD SQUAT

DEADLIFT

MILITARY PRESS

BOX JUMP

BACK EXTENSION

PULL-UP

BENT ROW

CLEAN/SNATCH PULL

DEPTH DROP

DEPTH JUMP

GLUTE-HAM RAISE

GLUTE-HAM SIT-UP

GOOD MORNING

HANGING LEG RAISE

HIP EXTENSION

JUMP SQUAT

KETTLEBELL SWING

LUNGE

BULGARIAN SPLIT SQUAT

© 2015 by Petrov Productions